Tag Archives: Arduino

mellotronium 2.0: rebuild

mellotronium_2

after our move to Oregon two months ago, i’m finally getting back to a spot where i can do more building and experimentation. that being said, my arduino-based sampler/synth is getting a rebuild to make it more capable and road-worthy.

the LED segment display is currently showing voltage out what should be 5v DC. i think the power adapter might be limited on the amount of current it can provide which is creating a voltage drop. either that or the 3.3v and 5v pins are reading the load from the BJT stage which stabilizes and adds sonic color to the PWM output. also, i’ve dropped in an ATMega2560 board and removed the 328p for added storage and memory for more sample time. with some code revisions, i’m hoping to keep the processor for locking up when adding lots of modulations.

arduino temperature TV…

arduino_temp_tv

kind of a goofy experiment, but really useful. i’ve had a lot of LM335Zs laying around for a while. my christmas present this year was a new Arduino Mega 2560 board that i’ve hardly had a chance to do anything with. using the lovely Space Tinkerer’s blog and the good ol’ TVOut library, i turned a thrift store bargain into a fancy CRT monitor that reports the ambient temperature on the work bench.

Arduino: Mellotronium loops…

a little improvisation i did after improving the LFO phase modulation and arpeggiator functions of the Mellotronium: an ATMega328P-based mirco-synthesizer. there are plenty of improvements to be made, but it’s surprising how much you can make of these microcontrollers do. combined with a Roland RC-50, it’s music composition on the fly.

you’ll have to excuse the loud hissing noise. apparently the power supply of my netbook isn’t exactly quiet. it sounds a lot better using the battery pack or the wall wart.

ARDUINO: Setting up a Gentoo development environment…

if you’re reading this post, most likely you’re having issues with setting up Crossdev as mentioned on the arduino.cc site. i tried countless times to configure my system for AVR compiling that way, but it always failed compiling avr-libc and would never compile avr-g++ no matter how i applied the USE flags. in short, i had to manually compile the necessary environment and this article is so i don’t forget how that’s done. it seems there are only a smattering ink blot’s worth of people developing Arduino sketches under the Gentoo distribution, but this should work (in theory) for most any Linux distro out there since it’s all manual installation. if anyone happens to hit a snag during their installation, feel free to let me know.

Download the tool chain…

getting the right version is the key. some newer versions don’t play nice with ATMEL’s chips for whatever reason.

1) BinUtils 2.20.1a: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/binutils/binutils-2.20.1a.tar.bz2
2) GCC 4.3.6: http://gcc.petsads.us/releases/gcc-4.3.6/gcc-g++-4.3.6.tar.bz2
3) AVR LibC 1.7.1: http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/avr-libc/avr-libc-1.7.1.tar.bz2

these are the versions that both myself and Jose Moldonado in Spain have been able to run without problems.

Additional downloads…

you’ll need AVRDuDe. i installed it from source just to be safe, though i think the portage install is just as good.

http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/avrdude/avrdude-5.11.tar.gz

PREFIX and PATH

this is how my system is setup.

#PREFIX=/usr/i686-pc-linux-gnu/avr
#export PREFIX
#PATH=$PATH:$PREFIX/bin
#export PATH

make sure to do this FIRST. not modifying the PREFIX variable could potentially hose the whole system.

Compiling…

then you can start compiling binutils:

# cd binutils-2.20.1a
# mkdir obj-avr
# cd obj-avr
# ../configure --prefix=/usr/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu/avr --target=avr --disable-nls
# make
# make install

then onto gcc…

# cd gcc-4.3.6
# mkdir obj-avr
# cd obj-avr
# ../configure --prefix=/usr/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu/avr --target=avr --enable-languages=c,c++ --disable-nls --disable-libssp --with-dwarf2
# make
# make install

then avr-libc…

# cd avr-libc-1.7.1
# ./configure --prefix=/usr/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu/avr --build=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu --host=avr
# make
# make install

Symlinking your libs and includes…

now on my system, there was a /usr/avr folder that the Arduino IDE definitely looks in for the includes and additional libraries. i had to symlink two folders in order for the IDE to work.

# ln -s /usr/i686-pc-linux-gnu/avr/avr/include /usr/avr/include
# ln -s /usr/i686-pc-linux-gnu/avr/avr/lib /usr/avr/lib

…and that was that. the latest Arduino IDE ran without a hitch.

for more detailed information, go here: http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/install_tools.html

Mellotronium revised…

here’s an update on the new additions/approach to the Mellotronium. i’m attempting to redo the SD card routines once i get the functionality added. using the SD library just doesn’t work right when reading byte values at 8kHz. i’ve looked into the WaveHC library with the most success, but had to modify not to use an external DAC. a new wav file playing solution from the SD card will have to be found.

without the clunky SD lib, program space has opened up… a lot of it in fact. now i’ve started using a wavetable. this video just has a single sine wave, but it’s modulate with the LFO and its seven different waveforms not to mention an amplitude modulating ADSR filter.

the breadboard to the side contains an experimental active 2-band EQ (TLO82-based) which needs some work. if anyone has any experience with this, i would love to know why the schematic in the datasheet doesn’t work at all. i wound up having to recall the usage from a different schematic where you make a voltage divider from and peer it into the positive terminal on both opamps. it works… in a way. i think i’ve inverted the wave form or something strange. it also sometimes works better as a radio than an EQ which i think i like. it made for some interesting heterodyning.

Arduino: LFO Generator

here’s a treat for anyone that’s into the audio side of arduino. it’s an 8-bit two-timer based LFO Generator using timer 0/2 on an ATMega328p. i’m only using timer0 for output in this code. i’ve started implementing the LFO code into my 8-bit melotronium where timer2 is dedicated for the audio output. in the larger code base, timer0 just stores values in an unsigned integer that the other timer grabs and modulates the output mathematically. for now, this should be a good reference to anyone looking for the outline of an LFO with seven different wave forms.

#define cbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) &= ~_BV(bit))
#define sbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) |= _BV(bit))

uint8_t sineTable[] = {
  127,130,133,136,139,143,146,149,152,155,158,161,164,167,170,173,176,178,181,184,187,190,
  192,195,198,200,203,205,208,210,212,215,217,219,221,223,225,227,229,231,233,234,236,238,
  239,240,242,243,244,245,247,248,249,249,250,251,252,252,253,253,253,254,254,254,254,254,254,
  254,253,253,253,252,252,251,250,249,249,248,247,245,244,243,242,240,239,238,236,234,
  233,231,229,227,225,223,221,219,217,215,212,210,208,205,203,200,198,195,192,190,187,184,
  181,178,176,173,170,167,164,161,158,155,152,149,146,143,139,136,133,130,127,124,121,118,
  115,111,108,105,102,99,96,93,90,87,84,81,78,76,73,70,67,64,62,59,56,54,51,49,46,44,
  42,39,37,35,33,31,29,27,25,23,21,20,18,16,15,14,12,11,10,9,7,6,5,5,4,3,2,2,1,1,1,0,0,0,
  0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,9,10,11,12,14,15,16,18,20,21,23,25,27,29,31, 33,35,37,39,42,
  44,46,49,51,54,56,59,62,64,67,70,73,76,78,81,84,87,90,93,96,99,102,105,108,111,115,118,121,124
};

uint8_t tWave = 128;
uint8_t sWave = 255;
uint8_t ruWave = 128;
uint8_t rdWave = 128;
uint8_t rWave = 128;

int   i = 0;
int   rate;
int   waveform;
byte  d = HIGH;

void setup() {
  pinMode(3, OUTPUT);
  setupTimer();
  OCR0A = 128;
}

void loop() {
  waveform = map(analogRead(0),0,1023,1,7);
  rate = map(analogRead(1),0,1023,255,0);
  OCR0A = rate;
}

ISR(TIMER0_COMPA_vect) {
  if(i == 255) i = 0;
  switch(waveform) {
    case 1:
      analogWrite(3,sine(i));
    break;
    case 2:
      analogWrite(3,triangle(i));
    break;
    case 3:
      analogWrite(3, square(i));
    break;
    case 4:
      analogWrite(3, rampUp(i));
    break;
    case 5:
      analogWrite(3, rampDown(i));
    break;
    case 6:
      analogWrite(3, rand(i));
    break;
    case 7:
      analogWrite(3, white(i));
    break;
  }
  i++;
}

void setupTimer() {
  cli();
/*--- TIMER2 CONFIG ---*/
  sbi(TCCR2A,WGM20);
  sbi(TCCR2A,WGM21);
  cbi(TCCR2A,WGM22);
 
  sbi(TCCR2B, CS20);
  cbi(TCCR2B, CS21);
  cbi(TCCR2B, CS22);

  sbi(TCCR2A,COM2B1);
  cbi(TCCR2A,COM2B0);
   
 /*--- TIMER0 CONFIG ---*/ 
  cbi(TCCR0B,CS00);
  cbi(TCCR0B,CS01);
  sbi(TCCR0B,CS02);
 
  sbi(TCCR0A, COM0A1);
  cbi(TCCR0A, COM0A0);
    
  cbi(TCCR0A, WGM00);
  sbi(TCCR0A, WGM01);
  cbi(TCCR0A, WGM02);

  cbi(TIFR0,OCF0A);
  sbi(TIMSK0,OCIE0A);
  sei(); 
}

int sine(int i) {
  return sineTable[i];
}

int triangle(int i) {
  if(tWave >= 255) d = LOW;
  if(tWave <= 0) d = HIGH;
  if(d == HIGH) tWave++;
  if(d == LOW) tWave--;
  return tWave; 
}

int rampUp(int i) {
  ruWave++;
  if(ruWave > 255) ruWave = 0; 
  return ruWave;
}

int rampDown(int i) {
  rdWave--;
  if(rdWave < 0) rdWave = 255;
  return rdWave;
}

int square(int i) {
  if(i >= 128) sWave = 255;
  if(i <= 127) sWave = 0;
  return sWave;
}

int rand(int i) {
  if(i == rWave) rWave = random(255);
  return rWave;
}

int white(int i) {
  return random(255);
}

Update: Here's my current code for the ATTiny85. It's not exactly bug-free as there seems to be some issue with latch-up when the speed of the LFO is high. This of course could be remedied by limiting the map() function's minimum value. I can't remember off hand if there are any other issues. Good power supply and output filtering is definitely needed to reduce noise in any additional stages of the circuit. At some point, I'll just make a separate post detailing my tremolo effect circuit in detail (so many projects and so little time!). Until then:

/*
 * Title: LFO Generator for ATTiny85 v0.12
 * Author: Abram Morphew
 * Date: 09.19.2016
 * Purpose: Low frequency oscillator with wave output controls
 */

#define cbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) &= ~_BV(bit))
#define sbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) |= _BV(bit))

uint8_t sineTable[] = {
  127,130,133,136,139,143,146,149,152,155,158,161,164,167,170,173,176,178,181,184,187,190,
  192,195,198,200,203,205,208,210,212,215,217,219,221,223,225,227,229,231,233,234,236,238,
  239,240,242,243,244,245,247,248,249,249,250,251,252,252,253,253,253,254,254,254,254,254,254,
  254,253,253,253,252,252,251,250,249,249,248,247,245,244,243,242,240,239,238,236,234,
  233,231,229,227,225,223,221,219,217,215,212,210,208,205,203,200,198,195,192,190,187,184,
  181,178,176,173,170,167,164,161,158,155,152,149,146,143,139,136,133,130,127,124,121,118,
  115,111,108,105,102,99,96,93,90,87,84,81,78,76,73,70,67,64,62,59,56,54,51,49,46,44,
  42,39,37,35,33,31,29,27,25,23,21,20,18,16,15,14,12,11,10,9,7,6,5,5,4,3,2,2,1,1,1,0,0,0,
  0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,9,10,11,12,14,15,16,18,20,21,23,25,27,29,31, 33,35,37,39,42,
  44,46,49,51,54,56,59,62,64,67,70,73,76,78,81,84,87,90,93,96,99,102,105,108,111,115,118,121,124
};

uint8_t tWave = 128;
uint8_t sWave = 255;
uint8_t ruWave = 128;
uint8_t rdWave = 128;
uint8_t rWave = 128;

int   i = 0;
int   rate;
int   waveform;
byte  d = HIGH;
const uint8_t output = 1;                       // output pin #6 on ATTiny85

void setup() {
  setupTimer();
  pinMode(3, INPUT);
  pinMode(2, INPUT);
  pinMode(output, OUTPUT);
  OCR0A = 128;
}

void loop() {
  waveform = map(analogRead(2),0,1023,1,6);
  rate = map(analogRead(3),0,1023,255,0);
  OCR0A = rate;
}

ISR(TIMER0_COMPA_vect) {
  if(i == 255) i = 0;
  switch(waveform) {
    case 1:
      analogWrite(output,sine(i));
    break;
    case 2:
      analogWrite(output,triangle(i));
    break;
    case 3:
      analogWrite(output, square(i));
    break;
    case 4:
      analogWrite(output, rampUp(i));
    break;
    case 5:
      analogWrite(output, rampDown(i));
    break;
    case 6:
      analogWrite(output, rand(i));
    break;
    case 7:
      analogWrite(output, white(i));
    break;
  }
  i++;
}

void setupTimer() {
  cli(); 
 /*--- TIMER0 CONFIG ---*/  
  TCCR0A = 0b10000011;
  TCCR0B = 0b00001010;    // last 3 bits set prescalar for Timer0

  cbi(TIFR,OCF0A);
  sbi(TIMSK,OCIE0A);
  sei(); 
}

int sine(int i) {
  return sineTable[i];
}

int triangle(int i) {
  if(tWave >= 255) d = LOW;
  if(tWave <= 0) d = HIGH;
  if(d == HIGH) tWave++;
  if(d == LOW) tWave--;
  return tWave; 
}

int rampUp(int i) {
  ruWave++;
  if(ruWave > 255) ruWave = 0; 
  return ruWave;
}

int rampDown(int i) {
  rdWave--;
  if(rdWave < 0) rdWave = 255;
  return rdWave;
}

int square(int i) {
  if(i >= 128) sWave = 255;
  if(i <= 127) sWave = 0;
  return sWave;
}

int rand(int i) {
  if(i == rWave) rWave = random(255);
  return rWave;
}

int white(int i) {
  return random(255);
}

Arduino: the 8-bit Mellotronium prototype

i’ve been pretty Arduino obsessed over the past month. i got in my head this idea about building a midi-controlled digital sampler that uses SD cards for storage after thumbing through the Arduino Cookbook and have finally started to make some headway on the project.

there were some major obstacle to overcome, unfortunately. the first came about when i had some trouble loading the larger libraries (e.g. MIDI.h, SD.h). i spent days trying to figure out what the problem was and even went so far as to update the bootloader to use optiboot. it turned out to be the version of GCC that i was using to compile my sketches. the toolchain setup on Gentoo is no easy task, so i went ahead and just compiled it manually. for those of you tempting to use develop AVR software in a Linux environment, i’d recommend the avr-libc install guide as your path to unbridled success. i myself could never get cross-dev to work with out failing and it needs certain USE flags which it just always overrode when i specified them.

from then on, things were pretty standard. i was able to load SD.h and begin reading files from the card. i used simple voltage dividers to convert the ATMega328’s 5v logic to the SD’s 3.3v like the standard schematic shows and then hacked up the PCMAudio Library to work as i’ve wanted. i borrow some of the techniques from Max’s article on generating real-time audio using PCM. much different than my overall goal, but extremely educational. if you’re baffled by the ATMega328’s use of PWM as i was, Ken Sherif’s article on PWM will clear all that up.

the code’s not worth posting at the moment. it’s a commented out mess of gray. i’ll most likely post it (for my own sake) when i’ve got more of the kinks worked out.

Arduino: second verse, same as first… sort of

well, not really. feeble attempt and making some sort of microprocessor controlled tempo clock, but a good exercise in the ATMEGA328s finicky behavior. don’t ask me what that squeal is. i think it comes from the way the input was wired up (mistaking the second sleeve as a synonym for ground) coupled with the PWM stream not having a negative offset, but who knows. eventually, i’ll move off the tone() crutch and start working with more interesting DSP. it’ll be nice to start using some of the memory on the chip.

i will also post the schematic for the delay pedal once i’ve got the values i want in it. i won’t have any time nor tools to tear into it until next week though.

Arduino: Analog Aerials

Essentially the oBITerator program with aerials instead of actual input signal. Of course, we’ve got to mix in the newly constructed PT2399 pedal. A little work needs to happen in the common-collector preamp which I’m mainly using to lower the input impedance into the delay chip. I’ll be recalculating those values soon as well as switching out a couple of the ceramic caps. They sounded good on the bread board initially, but I’d like to have a little less cutoff. Of course, no experiment would be complete without an LM386-based cigar box amplifier powering a Weber 12″ signature alnico.